Yandina Station wedding

Yandina Station wedding

Bride and groom with their dear little son in arms

Married at Yandina Station

Congratulations Adele and Paul, married at Yandina Station between Yandina and Coolum.

Vintage Theme wedding

Using a vintage wedding theme, Adele decorated the homestead with a table of old cameras, old books tied with string, bottles of old fashioned sweets and a vintage typewriter for writing messages.

Historic Yandina Station

Yandina Station was perfect for their theme.  The old homestead still has the original hardwood weather boards, delightfully aged to silver.  The gardens reflect a time gone by, yet retain a relaxed and homely feel, with herbs and flowers.  Old worldy games on the grass were very welcoming, and the sunny day was perfect.

Kids at a wedding

Their son Mac was a star, carrying the rings on a string around his neck.

Their wedding ceremony

Adele and Paul’s wedding ceremony began: “Unions have been made in this area for millennia.  Today Adele and Paul join the natural scheme of things and wed in this sacred place between Mount Ninderry and Mount Coolum close to Maroochy River.  For 10’s of thousands of years these mountains have been revered and blessed, and honoured for their significance and power.  It is a healing place, a happy place.  In the shadow of these mountains people feel safe and warm and blessed.  To be able to see both Ninderry and Coolum from here makes this place very special.  No wonder Adele and Paul chose this historic property for their special day.  Yandina Station homestead, well over 100 yrs old, and now lovingly restored is the oldest continuously lived in and working farm in the region.  Many pages of history reside here.  And today we add to those pages with a love story.”

Photos by Andrea Sproxton

Wedding vows to children

Wedding vows to children

Weddingvowstochildren_1

Wedding promises to your children.

Allow me to give you a glimpse of the story of Shireen and Aaron who wed at the beautiful and elegant Spicers Clovely Estate. Their wedding was a very classy occasion. 

However it was also clearly a family affair, including promises to the kids.

A family affair

When I met Shireen and Aaron, it was evident that love for their kids was paramount.  In fact the kids came with them to their wedding appointment with me; gorgeous kids, with a sweet attitude, and calm demeanour.  They played on the veranda daybed while we arranged the wedding ceremony for Aaron and Shireen.

More than wedding vows

This wedding had to be about family as much as it was about two people. Their kids are darlings. It was clear how much love and care they have in their family surroundings.  The family unit is the most important part of Aaron and Shireen’s lives. Part of the aim of this wedding was to unite the  family in name as well as heart.  Designing their wedding ceremony had to include the kids as a really important part of the day.  

Of course they were part of the bridal party, as page boy and flower girl.  They walked down the aisle hand in hand, dressed to perfection, and stole the show… at least from the photographers point of view.  They stole our hearts.

When designing the ceremony, we needed to include something more poignant than appearances as well.

 

Creating Wedding Vows

In the meeting we discussed the meaning and reasons behind wedding vows.  Wedding vows are said from one partner to the other. These wedding vows are often humble and generous promises for future, for commitment and personal endeavour.  They reflect an endeavour to strive for a positive outcome no matter what.  In the case of Shireen and Aaron, it was clear there were other marriage promises in the air.  Their promises to each other seemed to include an unspoken promise to their children.

 

Vows to children

The more we talked about it, the more it seemed appropriate to make this unspoken promise an outward and public promise.  As a symbol of family unity and a commitment to the nurturing of these children, they chose to make a public wedding vow to their son and daughter.

Darlings, we just want you to know that we love you dearly.  

Part of this ceremony today is a promise to you,

that we will always love you,

always care for you,

and always be willing to listen and be present for you.  


Together we will go forward, united in same name as the “Amour” family.

A family story

Their wedding was truly sublime.  A family affair from morning to night.

Thanks to Taylah of Tay and Francis for the stunning images of this wedding at Clovelly Estate.

Handfasting wedding ceremonies

Handfasting wedding ceremonies

Handfasting Wedding Rituals

A handfasting wedding ceremony is just one way to say I do.

Handfasting rituals

Since ancient times couples have stood together in the ceremony of marriage. There are many rituals that have lasted centuries, that symbolise a couple’s love and commitment. The handfasting ceremony dates back to the time of the ancient Celts. It was often used to acknowledge the beginning of a trial period of a year and a day during which time a couple were literally bound together – hand fasted. It was, however, a temporary agreement, which could be made permanent after the trial period if both parties agreed.  It is from this wedding tradition that we know of the expression to “tie the knot”, or to “get hitched”.

Handfasting or tie the knot

Nowadays, the handfasting ceremony is used symbolically, as part of the declaration and wedding vows. It is a way of asking your intentions.

Would you like to Tie the Knot?

Today a couple can embrace an age-old marriage tradition, making it your own in a modern day ceremony. In a handfasting wedding ritual, a cord is tied about your hands as you take your vows.

In this handfasting ritual, the couple answer a series of questions. For each question a binding, for each binding a promise.

Once you are all tied up, as your marriage celebrant I can release the cords.  For in fact, it is your promises that bind you not the cords!  But you get to keep the cord … for fun!

Thanks to the wonderful  Luke Going for the beautiful images of this touching moment. His work is unique.

Cate and Dave were married by the lake.  They wanted a relaxed wedding, something a little different, not churchy, but laid back like themselves.  They embraced a Handfasting to express their vows.

How does it work?

Here are some ways to approach a handfasting ceremony.  Of course I am here with many examples at my fingertips, a whole list of vows for you to choose from, and a wealth of creative spirit to write for you.  Let’s mix it up, modernise the sentiments and reference the traditions that you want to hold onto.

Traditional Handfasting vows

handfasting with coloured cords
handfasting ribbons and cords
ribbons for handfasting

The traditional handfasting promises are a series of questions.  They acknowledge that life is not always easy, that relationships sometimes have unintentional outcomes.  But a good intent underlies the love.The classic questions begin like so:

Celebrant to groom: Will you cause her pain?
Groom: I may

Celebrant to groom: Is that your intention?
Groom: No

Celebrant to bride: Will you cause him pain?
Bride: I may

Celebrant to bride: Is that your intention?
Bride: No

Celebrant to both: Will you share each other’s pain and seek to ease it?
Both: Yes

Celebrant to both: Please join your hands.

The first cord is draped across the bride and grooms hands.

Celebrant to bride: Will you share his laughter?
Bride: Yes

Celebrant to groom: Will you share her laughter?
Groom: Yes

Celebrant to both: Will both of you look for the brightness in life and the positive in each other?
Both: Yes

Celebrant: And so the binding is made

Modern handfasting questions

But you can devise modern handfasting promises instead.  Something along the lines of:

Do you vow in your married life together to continually break through your pre-conceived views of each other and see clearly.
Couple: We do

Do you vow to act wisely and compassionately with one another and with all beings.
Couple: We do

In my role as a writer, I can chat with you and then devise a series of questions that suit your very own values and ideals for approaching your relationship.

Romantic Handfastings

Or perhaps you’d prefer something rather romantic.

Will you promise your deepest love, your fullest devotion, your tenderest care, and your faithfulness through the pressures of the present and the uncertainties of the future?

Bruce & Emma: We pledge

Do you promise to be an equal loving partner, in a loving, honest relationship, standing by each other’s side, making a shelter of your heart, a home of your arms, encouraging your partner’s daily endeavours?

Bruce & Emma: We pledge

As you face the future together will you pledge to grow in your love for each other, to nurture the love that already is, honour and cherish each other, being there always?

Bruce & Emma: We pledge 

Handfasting ribbons 

You can get quite creative with the handfasting wedding vow format.  Imagine having a different coloured ribbon for each promise. And each wedding promise sculpted around the meanings of those colours.

Red for passion and love

For example the handfasting could become a statement instead of a question:

I promise to love passionately and unwaveringly with my heart, my body and my soul.

A pink ribbon could symbolise unity, honour, truth, romance, and happiness, with the statement:

I promise you my undying love, honesty and commitment in creating and nourishing our loving equal partnership.

A yellow ribbon would mean charm, confidence, joy, balance

Black could equal strength, wisdom, vision and or success

Green stands for prosperity, health, abundance and fertility

Blue often represents tranquillity, patience, understanding and a safe journey

Of course purple is for power, healing, sanctity and sentimentality.

Wedding Handfasting vows
coloured ribbons for handfasting

Contact me now to chat about your handfasting ceremony.

Married in a white chapel with a bit of French

Married in a white chapel with a bit of French

~ with Sunshine Coast wedding celebrant Kari ~

Congratulations to Douglas and Melissa, a gorgeous and fun loving couple, married at The Little White Wedding Church in Maleny.

Both Melissa and her parents are from Paris, and key wedding guests were coming from France especially for this divine wedding.  So they sought a celebrant who might be able to weave in a little French to make all the guests feel at home.

What they didn’t know at the time was that even some French ritual could also be woven into the ceremony.  So when I suggested the white ribbon ritual, Melissa jumped at the chance for some fun in her ceremony.

In France it is a tradition for a town’s children to stretch white ribbons across the road down which the bride travels.  She must cut the ribbons to make a path.

These are symbolic obstacles created for them to overcome together and thus pave a common path in their new life together.

On her wedding day in honour of Melissa’s background we stretched white ribbons across the aisle before she entered the church following the Bridesmaids.
As she strolled down the aisle, she had to cut her way through the “obstacles” to get to her guy. She laughed as she commented that she’d do anything to get to the altar where he was waiting. We hoped she had scissors with her tucked into that bouquet!

And she did.

And what story about a french wedding would be complete without some French Poetry;

Read by her sister and bridesmaid, Savita.  Durant l’hiver by Célia Germinario

Durant l’hiver on s’est rencontré,                        
Amour, gentillesse, beauté à mes yeux tu es,
Mon coeur, mon corps et mon âme je t’ai donné,
Il ne peut rien t’arriver,
Eternellement prêt de toi je serai,
Nos coeurs sont mêlés à jamai
During the winter we met,
You are Love, kindness, beauty to my eyes,
my heart, my body and my soul I have given thee,
there is no more life can bring
Eternally ready for thee I will be,
our hearts mingled forever
 

What a fun day it was.  Thank you to the delightful and subtle Matt Rowe for the images.  He is everywhere and nowhere at the same time, capturing each moment, each smile.  Thanks Matt.  And checkout his new cover image!!!

[cq_vc_gallery images=”38225,38227,38226,38229,38228,38224,38230″]
Wedding with kids

Wedding with kids

~ with Sunshine Coast marriage celebrant, Kari ~

Congratulations Hayley and Wade with their darling children, Charlotte and Kobi, married in the delightful Tiffany’s Chapel.

(Check out the photo which I call “Wrapping the bride!”)

We seek ceremony when there is something profound happening.  We do things in ceremony that are symbols of a deeper meaning in our lives.  Some things are not easy to express every day, as we live it.  Some things  are best expressed by ritual.  A wedding does this.  It creates an opportunity to gather the important people, and to enunciate deep feelings in the form of promises or gifts.

Hayley and Wade’s wedding day was a dream come true.  And it was a wedding about family.  Hayley and Wade believe that family is first, family is everything, family is LIFE.

Often a wedding is not simply about two people.  It is about a wider group of people; community, family, heart families.  This wedding was for everyone there.

A wedding could not alter what they already had, for Hayley and Wade had already built a marriage.  I saw it expressed so well in their dear children, Charlotte and Kobi.  As I spoke with the couple, the kids played with my lego basket. (Yes a relic of my own child rearing.  I LOVE my son’s lego basket, and so do many of the kids who come to me with their parents.)  As they played I noticed how gentle they were with each other and the things they created.  Their parents took small moments to acknowledge what the kids were doing, and kids were very respectful of their parents having a talk.  Impressive parenting at work here!

So this marriage was about a family unit, yet acknowledging of the important relationship that holds the family together, the parents.  For Hayley and Wade wished to give the gift of marriage to each other.  They had already promised forever in their kids, but on their wedding day they showed it to each other.

Charlotte and Kobi, (who are, may I say, the best behaved kids I have ever seen!) were delightful partners to the wedding as flower girl and ring boy.  Kobi was quite emotional watching his parents wed.  Who wouldn’t be?  He could deeply appreciate the strong emotions that were being expressed that day. Check out Charlotte wrapping herself in Mum’s bride dress. I sneeked the ones of the “bridal wrap” while Toni, the photographer, was organising the group picture.  Too delightful to miss!

Wrapping a bride

A key to understanding this was their choice of reading:

The key to love is understanding…
The ability to comprehend not only the spoken word,
but those unspoken gestures,
the little things that say so much by themselves.
The key to love is forgiveness…
to accept each others faults and pardon mistakes,
without forgetting, but with remembering
what you learn from them.

The key to love is sharing…
Facing your good fortunes as well as the bad, together;
both conquering problems, forever searching for ways
to intensify your happiness.

The key to love is giving…
without thought of return,
but with the hope of just a simple smile,
and by giving in but never giving up.

The key to love is respect…
realising that you are two separate people, with different ideas; that you don’t belong to each other,
that you belong with each other, and share a mutual bond.

The key to love is inside us all…
It takes time and patience to unlock all the ingredients that will take you to its threshold;
it is the continual learning process that demands a lot of work… but the rewards are more than worth the effort…
and that is the key to love.

Thanks to Photographer Toni Snell for the glorious images.

Hayley&Wade_1Hayley&Wade_2Hayley&Wade_3Hayley&Wade_4Hayley&Wade_5Hayley&Wade_6Hayley&Wade_8Hayley&Wade_9